November 20, 2014 Full Contact

Rump Roast and the Power of Social Media

Here at Full Contact, we love a lot of things; eating great food and supporting local businesses are both consistently at or near the top of the list. So you can imagine our excitement when we recently discovered an awesome local meat share program. 

The concept is simple: They deliver “local, sustainable and honest meats” – all coming from less than 250 miles away – right to your front door. The products are different every month, and there’s no commitment.

When I got my first delivery to the office, the contents included a cornucopia of meat ­– short ribs, bacon, bratwurst, a whole chicken – as well as a free sample of some locally made barbeque sauce. I also got a meat thermometer and a little binder to store the recipes that come with each delivery.

Cool.

Excitement spread through the office – particularly to account guy Dan Gross. He reached out to the farm that day but was told that the month’s products had already been delivered, and he would have to wait four weeks until the next delivery. Well, a month was just too long for Dan, so he struck a deal with them: Send me a delivery by the end of the week, and I’ll send out a referral – products unseen – to my Twitter followers.

If I used this tactic, the folks at the farm would laugh (I have about 10 Twitter followers). Dan, though, has nearly 2,000 active Twitter followers, so the farm (smartly) took him up on the offer, delivering 11 pounds of meat to him that afternoon. So, as promised, Dan tweeted a note about them, and, sure enough, the referrals started to roll in. By the end of the week, Dan’s tweet inspired a dozen other people to sign up for the meat delivery, and Dan reaped the benefits – for every person that signed up, he got $10 off his next order.

The impressive deal the farm and Dan struck, while on a small scale, is an important reminder of how brands and consumers are successfully connecting today in social media. The consumer wants a unique, high quality product that is consistent and reliable. The brand wants a champion who is willing to try new things and share his or her experience with friends. Both parties are rewarded when the experience is positive. But in order to be successful, both parties need to hold up their ends of the bargain.

A simple reminder that brands – large and small – should consider.

As for the rest of us carnivores, we’re trading recipes, tips, and tricks – and are still gathering monthly to see what our local meat delivery has in store for us.

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